Yearning for God, Trying to Love My Neighbor, Making Theatre and Beauty, Building a Life...



Sunday, December 5, 2010

Pre-existent Memories: C.S. Lewis, Joseph Smith and the Hero’s Journey, Part Two

As outlined in my last post , Joseph Campbell's "Hero's Journey" and concepts like Carl Jung's archetypes and "collective unconscious" seem to tie well into J.R.R. Tolkien and Hugo Dyson's conversation with C.S. Lewis that helped convince him to become a Christian... that the similarity between world mythologies and Christianity is because they are being drawn from the same source, a pre-existent memory, a collective unconsciousness that is guiding mankind towards the "true myth" of Christianity.

The Christ story, however, is not the only "true myth." I've seen Campbell's pattern not only pop up in religious narratives such as the life of Christ and Buddha and Muhammad (some whose historicity is obviously debated depending on your religious views), but also in the lives of more established historical figures... try applying Campbell's pattern to Joan of Arc for example, and other epic figures like Abraham Lincoln or Martin Luther King, Jr. You'll find some striking consistency. One of the most perfect examples I've found, however, is the life of Joseph Smith. His life plays out like an epic myth, the kind of stuff which would be seem obviously constructed after the fact, if we hadn't so many historical proofs to back up the basic outline of the story. Now, obviously, events like the First Vision are up for debate, if you're not an orthodox Mormon, but other events like Liberty Jail (which I'll figure conveniently in Campbell's "Belly of the Whale" stage) are without question historical facts in the American religious narrative. So I find it interesting that this pattern can crop up is non-structured scenarios in history, which attests to the universality of the Hero's Journey model and how it is not only a convenient way to plot a story, but also an immortal way to show the truth of how spirituality plays out.

Which brings us not only to the life of Joseph Smith, but the pattern he layed out about man's existence, what Mormons like to call the Plan of Salvation. In the rest of my essay, I'll go through Campbell's Hero's Journey pattern and apply it first to Joseph Smith's life and by then I think you'll also see how the pattern applies to the Plan of Salvation and our individual journeys through mortality:

Saturday, December 4, 2010

Pre-Existent Memories: C.S. Lewis, Joseph Smith and the Hero's Journey, Part One

For the past several years I have had a connection that has been floating around in my brain which I've been itching to iterate. In studying things as far flung as psychology, C.S. Lewis, Mormon theology/history, literary/mythical archetypes, world religions, and diverse world histories, these disparate parts have led me to connections which form a pattern to the experiences of C.S. Lewis, the life of Joseph Smith, but also to the Mormon concept of the Plan of Salvation.

I have been teaching about Joseph Campbell's "The Hero's Journey" in my high school creative writing class and so it has set me back on this track of thinking which has been boring its way into my everyday unconscious for a long time now. For those unaware of what exactly "The Hero's Journey" is, it chiefly comes from a book Joseph Campbell wrote called The Hero with a Thousand Faces . Written in 1949, it was a very important book that set forth the idea that there are patterns and archetypes found in all sorts of disparate mythology, fairy tales, religious narratives, and folk lore. That all these stories from unconnected and far flung cultures follow one basic story. It is also a trend that can be found in epic literature and film, which is uncannily and unconsciously present in everything from Homer's The Odyssey to Tolkien's Lord of the Rings. And many writers now purposely craft their tales to follow this pattern, George Lucas's Star Wars being one of the most famous examples.

I also purposely followed this pattern with my play Prometheus Unbound several years ago (and have addressed it less directly in other plays such as Swallow the Sun and my new work Manifest), much because the idea has fascinated me ever since I was taught it in my high school sophmore honors English class. Ms. Drummond mentioned Carl Jung's revolutionary studies in the early and mid 20th century about archetypes (a simpler overview here) and the collective unconscious. In my terms, archetypes are repeating patterns that happen in mythology and other stories, in psychology, in dreams, and even (at least from what I've been able to observe) in many points in recorded, literal history (try applying this pattern to Joan of Arc, for example). And the collective unconscious is a kind of shared subconscious mind... a repository of pre-existent information that is spiritually or psychologically hard wired into human beings and acts as a kind of unseen guide that assists them through the human drama.